The Truth About Employees, Divorce and Productivity

It  is well-documented that divorce can be one of the most stressful situations anyone can experience.  In the UK roughly 42% marriages end in divorce.  So it is highly likely that some of your employees will be going through a divorce at some time.

The thing about employees is that they are people first, with complex emotions and feelings.  We don’t just shrug off our feelings, like coats, and hang them on a hook when we walk into the workplace.

So how we feel at any one time or any particular day will affect our performance, concentration and productivity. Employers may not want to acknowledge this, and deal with it.  But good employers recognise that their workers have things going on which are probably more important than work -at least for the individuals.

Is there anything an employer can do for employees who may be facing divorce?

Legalities and changes in the Law regarding divorce

It has been widely reported that “no fault divorce” is to be introduced in the UK.  The intention is to end the blame game and make divorce easier for those involved.

This is undoubtedly good news and should lessen acrimony in divorce cases.  But divorce is going to remain unpleasant for those who go through it.  There will still be financial disputes and anxiety over children and access.  If your employee is going through a divorce their private life will be disrupted and their work will also be adversely affected.

 What effects am I likely to see on my employees?

The most likely effect on your employee is stress.  This may mean loss of concentration and increased anxiety.  They may use work as a refuge from the storm in their private life.  If they are engaged and involved in their work, it may indeed be a relief from the stress.  But it is more likely that they will only pay partial attention to their work.

The divorcing employee is likely to need to make court appearances, maybe multiple times if there is disagreement about financial aspects or access to children.  It may be that the employee is going through a change in their living accommodation, or the sale of a jointly owned house.  They are very likely to have increased financial worries.

How can an employer help employees who are divorcing?

There are some practical steps an employee can and should take to support their employees through a divorce.

This is an example of a situation which can be greatly helped if you already have a trusting and effective relationship with your employees.  If they trust you or their line manager, they will be more open about their personal circumstances.  You can build on that trust if you provide practical and relevant help to them.

The first issue is with regard to financial management.  Divorcing couples need to exchange financial information and often need documents to confirm details of salary, benefits, bonuses, pension arrangements.  An employer can help by providing that information quickly.

Some more ways an employer can help

Another issue which will affect your divorcing employee may be the need for time off work to attend court hearings in relation to the divorce, especially if it is an acrimonious divorce.  There is no legal requirement that you give paid time off for this, but you may wish to allow them to use up annual leave, or take unpaid leave.  Or a generous employer may wish to give additional paid leave (but you would need to give this some thought to ensure fairness to other, non-divorcing, employees).

However well an employee may be dealing with a divorce, you would be well advised to keep an eye on their mental health.  These will be stressful times for them and we all react differently in such circumstances.  Some of this will depend on how acrimonious the divorce is and whether there are children involved.   It may be helpful  to think about how to provide counselling or employee assistance if you do not already have such a scheme in place.

Benefits for the employer in supporting an employee through divorce

If you have a positive relationship with your employees, they are more likely to be honest with you about an impending divorce.

How can you provide practical and relevant support to them?  If you can do so, the situation is likely to resolved more quickly.  This is a benefit to the employee, of course.  But that also makes it better for you.

A reduction in the stress of the situation may lead to reduced likelihood of ill-health absence.  The employee will be more focussed at work and more able to concentrate.  This has a positive effect on their productivity.

There are more benefits for the employer

The secondary effect is loyalty.  An employee who has had support from their employer through a difficult personal situation is easier to retain in the workplace.  They will not want to risk moving to a less understanding workplace.

Your reputation as a caring and good employer will also be enhanced.  This will have a positive effect on recruitment and employee satisfaction.

Being kind to our employees and supporting them through difficult times is not only good for them, but it is also good for us as employers.  We all want to be cared for and cared about, and that includes employers.  And it doesn’t hurt the bottom line, either.

 If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on supporting an employee through a difficult time in their personal life, then  contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

How Employees With Mismatched Skills Are Damaging Your Company’s Productivity

Many companies are employing people with mismatched skills and this is damaging productivity and profitability within their business.

I wrote an article in February this year about the dangers of recruiting employees with the wrong skills for the vacant position. Many employers look for skills that aren’t needed to get the job done.   Almost half of employees in the UK are in jobs with mismatched skills.  They are either over-or-under skilled for the job.  Or they might have the wrong qualification, or are not qualified at all.

A report by the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development (CIPD) last year found that over a third (37%) of workers have the skills to cope with more demanding jobs.  Additionally, many people with degrees are in jobs which do not require such a high level of qualification. Conversely, one in ten people reported lacking the skills needed to carry out their job effectively.  The report concluded that as many as half of UK workers could be in the wrong job, based on their skill level.

Why does it matter if your employees have mismatched skills?

Mismatched skills bring negative impacts for our employees.  This has a knock-on negative effect on our business.

For employees, the CIPD survey found that over-skilled workers earn less than those whose skills are well-matched to their jobs.  This can result in a long term inability to increase their salary to a level they feel equals their skills. This can lead to resentment.

On the other hand, if someone has not got the relevant skills for their job, then they can become stressed and may work longer hours than is healthy.

Other issues for employees who have mismatched skills may include:

  • reduced chances of promotion;
  • difficulty in getting a new job;
  • poor job satisfaction;
  • lack of trust in the workplace;
  • lower confidence.

Why does an employer need to worry about this?

For employers, these implications for our workers are a key factor in the productivity levels for our business.

If our employees have mismatched skills, they are less likely to do a good job for us.   Their motivation and job satisfaction will suffer.  As a result, they may become resentful and even disruptive.   Their sickness absence levels are likely to increase.  All of these things are difficult to manage in the workplace and result in cost (in time and money) for the employer.

You may start to wonder why you have been unable to recruit a more satisfactory and happy employee.  Employers often think that it is difficult to recruit the right people.  But it may be more accurate that they are not even looking for the right people.

You may also find that employees are leaving only a short time after they started working for you.  Over-skilled employees will want to leave and find a job which is better matched to their skills.  And under-skilled employees may just be very unhappy because they struggle to do the job.

All of these things affect the overall productivity of your workforce.  And that increases your costs and reduces your profits.

How can I address the problem of mismatched skills?

If you ensure your employees have the right skills for their jobs, either through recruitment or training (or both), then they will be happier in the workplace and you will benefit from higher productivity and increased profitability.

To avoid mismatching skills to jobs in your company, there are some key areas where you might want to take some action.

  • Recruitment . A good place to start is to review your recruitment process.  Have you got a recruitment strategy?  If so, does it need to be adjusted?  How accurate are your job descriptions? Have you reviewed your job descriptions lately?
  • Skills Development And Training. Is it time for you to invest in some training? You could arrange some skills development for the current job holders, where they are under-skilled.  Clearly this will address specific problem areas.  But it can also send a powerful message about valuing your employees .
  • Conducting a skills audit. This can give a clear picture of the skills you already have in your workplace. You may be unaware of some of them.  It is certainly likely that you will find a number of areas where some adjustments can be made in terms of job design or training plans.   It could even lead to some restructuring if you can move people around to address some of the key skills gaps.
  • Job design. Once you understand the skills you have in your workplace, you can prioritise better use of those skills.  Then you can adapt how well  and where those skills are used.  You can then ensure you have the right jobs with the right people in them.  And you can recruit and train others, as necessary.
  • Management training. Your managers are key in this whole process and it will pay you to ensure they have the skills to support employee development. You may want to review your management practices as well and ensure your managers are confident in those practices.

What benefit will it bring?

If you can address these key areas, your employees may start to use their skills fully and appropriately in the workplace.  This will bring them increased levels of job satisfaction.  They are likely to earn more throughout their career and have more confidence and less stress.

This can lead to increased loyalty, trust and motivation.  Your retention rates will go up and the money you need to spend on recruitment will reduce.  All of this leads to higher productivity, more rapid growth and – ultimately – better profitability for your business.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support with a skills audit, recruitment strategy or anything else we have covered, then please contact us for a free half-hour discovery call.

Jill Aburrow runs a strategic HR consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to Professional Services businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades, supporting Information Technology companies. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

 

Is Being “Always On” Good For Productivity?

What impact does technology and the “always on” culture have on productivity?

Technology allows us to work when and where we want to.  But is the “always on” culture good or bad news for productivity in UK business?

A recent article in HR News discusses a recent survey by Aviva. The findings are that 72% of UK workers are checking their emails outside of work hours. On average we spend up to two and a half hours per week working outside our usual hours.  This equates to an extra 16 days at work per year.

Employers may feel this is good for productivity.  Additionally, in these days of flexible working, we like to be able to work at times to suit our lifestyles.  Technology allows us to do this, so where is the problem?

Is it bad to be able to work outside normal hours?

Many people like the freedom to catch up with some work in the evenings or at weekends.  If we work flexibly, it gives us the chance to take time out of work during normal hours.  Then we can make up the time missed when it suits us to do so.

But the downside is that we never really leave work behind for the day.  It is too easy to keep in touch remotely, which means managers can (and do) send emails outside working hours.  That is fine and they probably don’t expect an answer there and then.  But many of us see an email from the boss and think we need to be working because our manager is working.  It doesn’t matter how much a manager says “do as I say, not as I do”, it is human nature to want to please.  Particularly, we want to please the boss. So if we see them working we automatically feel guilty if we aren’t working too.

There is emerging evidence that this is having a detrimental effect on mental and physical well-being. We want to please the boss, but we also want to spend quality time with family and friends.  And we need to have a break from work.  Research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) in 2019 found that 87% of organisations reported the inability to switch off after hours as the biggest negative effect on employee well-being.

What can employers do?

Have you thought of banning email at weekends or after certain hours? American healthcare company, Vynamic, have banned people from sending emails between 10pm and 6am and any time at the weekend.

You may think that this policy is a backward step for flexible working.  But the ban is only on hitting “send”.  Managers and employees are free to work whenever they please and to draft emails, but they are not able to send the emails.  If the matter is urgent, they can text or telephone the other party.  Vynamic have found that this ban is really effective.  Because there is no danger of getting emails, employees don’t feel the need to check for any and so they are free to enjoy their downtime.  And the sender of an email has to stop and think if the matter is so urgent that they need to send a text or pick up the phone.  Mostly it is not that urgent.

The CEO of Vynamic says it is the best benefit they have ever introduced – and at no cost.  Employee well-being has improved hugely.  What is more, the retention rate has increased as well as people want to continue to work for a company where they are valued and truly get a break at the end of the working day or week.

Do you want your employees to be well and happy?

Of course you do.  We all want that for our employees. It makes great business sense.  Well and happy employees are loyal and want to continue to work for you.  They are your advocates and tell your clients and the world that they work for a great company.

 

Then there is the financial aspect.  The cost of implementing this rule is fairly negligible, yet it has a huge impact.  The other financial benefits include reduced absence and a lesser need for recruitment.  How would you like to be the CEO of a company where everyone wants to work for you?

 If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

How Employee Financial Well-being Ignites Productivity

In August last year, I wrote an article about how you can support the financial well-being of your employees.  Now I want to concentrate on why this matters to employers.

This really fits as part of my current focus on productivity in the workforce.  A survey by Metlife UK  earlier this year  looked at employee financial well-being. 64% of senior managers said that addressing financial well-being will help boost productivity and engagement.

But businesses say they do not understand enough about the link between financial well-being, mental health and productivity.  They want more clarity on how to tackle this issue.

What is financial well-being and why does it affect people who are working?

In simple terms, employee financial well-being can be slotted into various categories.  Firstly we need to have an adequate salary to support ourselves and our families.  We need to be able to save for the future, in terms of things like mortgages or pension provision.  It is good to have a cushion to deal with emergencies.  And we want to be able to pay off existing debt.  These are key aspects of our financial well-being.   Understanding our finances and feeling in control is important.  And we want to feel that we are paid fairly for what we do and in comparison to others. It is linked to a belief about whether we are valued properly.

This is not just about pay (or low pay). It is not about financial mismanagement. And it is definitely not limited to a need for debt counselling.  Just because people are in employment, it does not mean they don’t have money worries.  And the worry is not confined to those on low pay.  Financial well-being can be a concern for all income groups, even those with a higher income or in a senior role. In fact, it can have a greater impact when we earn more.  The more we earn, the higher our financial commitments.

How does employee financial well-being impact the workplace?

The CIPD, in association with Close Brothers, carried out a study on employee financial well-being.  This shows that a quarter of employees say that financial concerns impact their performance at work.  The issues include loss of sleep. And time spent at work thinking about or dealing with financial problems.  It affects our productivity, our ability to do the job.  There can be an impact on ourconcentration and decision-making.   Additionally, nearly a third of people in the UK only have savings to cover up to three months if we lost our jobs.

There is a great deal of coverage in the press and social media about mental health and well-being in the workplace.  But many employers fail to grasp that employee financial well-being contributes hugely to employee mental health.  The CIPD has found that only a third of employers actively promote employee financial well-being.   This is largely because employers do not know where to start or how to work out what is needed .

Practical steps for employers

Larger employers  are more likely to provide benefits packages.  These may comprise a number of different benefits for employees.  Smaller businesses will offer a pension.  But they may not be in a position to offer a wider range of benefits.

Employers are well-advised to inform and educate employees about the options and what they mean.  This is the case however simple or limited the benefit package may be. Have you thought about consulting with employees to find out what is effective (or not)?  Are you confident they are making the right choices? This is even more important if you offer a variety of benefits.  Especially if people can choose which benefits to take.

There are many low cost or cost-free advice services which employers can provide.  Additionally, there may well be some local companies who would be glad to come into your workplace to advise and help your employees.  This may be at no cost to you, as the employer.

As employers, we have a duty of care towards our employees.  So we need to be aware of people who are working longer hours, not taking all their holidays.  Or those who are having unexplained sickness or are behaving uncharacteristically.  These could all be signs of problems.  And those problems could have financial difficulty as the root cause.  We have no right (or desire) to pry into people’s personal finances, of course.  But advice on where to seek help may be all that is needed.

What are the benefits for the employer?

How can you  help your employees to understand their finances and to become more able to control them?  If you can do this, you will benefit from a happier and more engaged workforce.  The immediate benefit is higher productivity. If people are getting a good night’s sleep and are able to concentrate at work, then they will be more effective, quicker and more accurate at work.

As an employer, you will benefit from the fact that people will have more trust in you. They know that you pay fairly, that you care about their welfare, that you support them through any difficulties.  This translates into better customer service, improved employer reputation, increased loyalty.  All of this improves business growth.  Why would any employer not want to see those benefits?

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

Why Being Organised Can Help You Increase Productivity

My Dad used to tell a story about his early days in the workplace.  This was well before we all had a computer on our desk (or even in the workplace at all).  His solution to managing his workload was to have an in-tray, an out-tray and a “kk” tray.  “kk” was his code for “can’t cope”.  If he had anything on his desk which he didn’t know how to deal with, he would put it in the “kk” tray.  Throughout the day, people would come to his desk, looking for reports and documents.  They were invariably in his “kk” tray and would be taken away by someone else.  That was his solution to organising his workload.

Now I don’t suggest this is a good way to plan your work, but at least it was an attempt to get organised.

How can being organised help productivity?

We often think that productivity is measured by the speed we get work done.  In the UK, productivity levels are falling,  yet we still work long hours. So the speed at which we work is only part of the issue.

What would happen if we were more organised (at home, as well as work)?  You may feel that you don’t have time to be organised, or that you work better with some chaos around you.  Many people deliberately keep piles of paper on their desk, and they always claim to know exactly which pile they can find a particular document. But they might be missing a trick.  Just the process of organising the stuff on our desks can help to organise it in our minds. It can also help reduce our stress. Looking at piles of papers can cause our subconscious minds to get overwhelmed at the tasks we see before us.

Time spent getting your employees organised is time well spent

A study in 2017 found that UK employees spend over a quarter of their day searching for information.  This might be because the previous expert has left, with the knowledge locked in their head.  Or it may be because companies have not invested in retrieval systems or technology to store information.

Imagine if you could reduce that figure.  Reducing it by a half would mean your employees were each productive for an hour more each day.

There is a school of thought which says that every hour spent planning and getting organised saves three or four hours of time that would otherwise be wasted. The return on investment is huge for being organised yourself and for putting systems in place to organise your employees.

My 7 point checklist for being organised

If you want to improve productivity in your business, then my 7 point checklist for being organised is this:

  • Action things immediately. Don’t ignore papers or emails – action them now or put in a diary entry. Then file the document or put the email in a folder  – or destroy them if you don’t need them.   This will help to keep desks clear.
  • Only action email at specific times during the day, don’t check them constantly. Just because you have an email, it doesn’t need an immediate response. If something is really urgent, then you will get a phone call or a visit.
  • Get rid of the to do list(s)– just put an action in your diary. You don’t have to remember everything and you have already planned when it will be achieved.   It is one less document to keep hanging around.
  • Make full use of technology and organisational structures.  Things like setting timers in meetings; single point information retrieval; automation of tasks.
  • Take regular breaks and work sensible hours and make your staff do the same. Productivity falls steeply after about six hours, so you need a break in the day to refresh your mind and give productivity a boost.
  • “Eat frogs” – (ie. do the unpleasant thing you are dreading first, then it doesn’t hang over you). And you get an energy boost when it is finished which will fuel you through the day.
  • Plan your day the night before. Then you are less likely to be sidetracked by “urgent” things cropping up during the day.   It also gives a sense of fulfilment at the end of the day, which is a great way to end your day.

How can a strategic HR overhaul help you with productivity?

If you involve an HR strategist in your business plans and initiatives, they can help you to understand the impact of those decisions.  We can help you to produce a bespoke strategy which works for your business.  That strategic plan provides the basis of policies and guidelines around the particular business area which is under review.  In short, we can help you get organised.

A strategic HR plan means you are not rushing to do things at last minute when they become urgent.  This ensures you have the right skills and experience within your team to manage any challenges which come your way.

A  strategic HR plan could include relevant training requirements for managers and staff.  It would also build in some accountability steps to help you keep on track, and provide any relevant overviews and refresher training plans.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.