4 Secrets to Stop Your Employees Leaving

A client recently told me he was concerned as his employees don’t want to be at work.  As a result, people go off sick, or they leave.   Sometimes they have not worked for the business very long when they decide to leave.

Another client told me that some of his employees don’t perform their jobs very well.  They just don’t seem to be very interested in being at work. He thought the problem was that the work is boring and he cannot offer much variety.

The reasons why employees become disengaged may not be what you think

The boss often thinks that the reason why people don’t stay long is because they are not paid enough.  Or it may be that the work is boring and mundane and people get bored quickly. Maybe they are just lazy.

Of course, all of those things – and others – could be part of the problem.

But there are some more fundamental reasons why businesses may have trouble in keeping their employees.

The 4 main reasons why people are not interested in their work

1.Our contribution. We all like to believe that we are important.    The need to contribute something to the world is in all of us.  No matter how mundane, “boring”, or repetitive our job may be, it is critical that we can see why we are doing it.

2.Appreciation.  We also want to believe that what we say, think and do is noticed and valued.  We all like to be thanked for things we have done.  It gives a warm feeling.

3.Our voice. Part of being appreciated is being able to give an opinion and knowing that it has been heard.  No matter how mundane the job may be, the person who does it every day is an expert.  They may have a good idea about making it more interesting, or speedier.

4.Trust.  We like to think we can be trusted to “get on with it” without interference or micro-managing.  We want to be able to trust those around us and, particularly, those in a position of authority.  In return, we want them to trust us.

These things are inter-related, but all stand alone as well.  They are the four critical factors if you want to engage with and motivate your employees.

So what should the employer be doing?

1.Vision. You should share the vision for your business with your employees.  All of them.  If your aim is to provide the cheapest Will Writing service in your town, then make sure your employees know that.  Make sure you show each employee that their specific role contributes to that goal.

The work placement student whose job is just to answer the phone needs to know that he/she is a critical part of the operation.  If the phone calls don’t get answered quickly and politely, you risk losing business and credibility.  It doesn’t matter how cheap your service is if you don’t have any customers.

This message should be repeated often.  Make sure your employees know the importance of their part of the business.  Ensure they don’t forget how important you believe they are.

2.Appreciation.  It doesn’t cost anything to thank people for their efforts.  You may think that someone hasn’t actually made much effort.  So thank them for the time they have invested.  Sometimes just an acknowledgement that someone has turned up for work is all that is needed.

One of the most successful managers I know made a point of going to the desk of each of her staff every day and saying “Good Morning”.  She would ask them how they were and have a one or two line conversation, passing the time of day.  It reaped huge benefits for her in terms of loyalty and effort on the part of her staff.

3.Listening.  Many managers say they have an open door policy.  But do they really mean it?  Are they so busy that their diary doesn’t have a free space for two weeks? So if your door is not really open very often, don’t advertise that it is.  Your employees may be brimming with fantastic ideas which could save time, money and effort.  Or they may have a pressing issue which really needs your input.  Or they may just want to let off steam.

You need to ensure that your employees can raise suggestions, complaints or ideas, whatever their reason.  And you need to really listen to those things and respond carefully. If they feel they cannot be heard, they will leave your employment to go and work somewhere else where they can be heard.

4.Integrity and Trust. Your employees need to know that you trust them.  They may need some supervision if they are unsure of the work, or are new to a process.  But once they have learnt the ropes and feel confident, then you should trust them.  Of course, if they abuse that trust, you will need to take action.  But it is much better to trust them until they prove untrustworthy. The vast majority will bend over backwards to deserve your trust.

Strangely, you will find that if you trust your employees and show them that trust, then they are very likely to trust you as well.  That is the basis of a sound working relationship.  Your employees are far less likely to leave your employment if they feel valued and trusted.

If you think this article is useful and you would like more advice on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

 

Performance Appraisal – Is It Just A Tick Box Exercise?

The debate has raged for years about whether the annual performance appraisal is just a tick box exercise or a useful management tool.

Many employees feel that this is just a painful exercise to satisfy HR and senior management. They think it doesn’t really mean anything. Especially if their voice is not heard.  Some HR practitioners and managers feel much the same way.

So what is the point of the performance appraisal?

Regular discussions between managers and their employees are really important.  These can be formal or informal, depending on the business and the style of working.  I would suggest that once a year is not nearly often enough.

Your people are an important asset (arguably the most important).  You need to ensure they are engaged with your business and aligned with your objectives.  Whatever you call these discussions – appraisals, reviews, 1-2-1 chats – they are an opportunity for you to listen to your employee.  They provide a chance for you to guide their successful employment journey with you.

The discussion should be a two-way conversation.  It needs to cover the employee’s job, their key responsibilities and their overall contribution to the company’s objectives.  It should help you jointly decide on development needs. Importantly, it should include recognition of the achievements and effort of the employee. Ideally, you should agree an action plan.  This doesn’t need to be long or complicated but it should reflect an agreed way forward.

Key points for discussion in a performance appraisal

  1. You need to highlight the things that the individual is doing well and any where some improvement is needed;
  2. Make sure they know how their performance contributes to the success of your business;
  3. Your aim should be to reach a joint decision about any training needs there are;
  4. Have an open discussion about any concerns they or you may have;
  5. Agree an action plan for moving forward.

 Critical factors for successful discussions:

  1. It is essential that there can be trust and openness between you . You should be building this from the first day of their employment with you.
  2. You need to be able to ask the right questions and make sure you really listen to the answers.
  3. The employee must be prepared to take responsibility for their actions, to hear and to learn.
  4. This is personal to that individual and should not be discussed with anyone else.  Keep it confidential.
  5. It is important to be consistent. The employee must come away with the knowledge that they have been treated fairly and in the same way as other people.

Things to avoid

  1. Once a year for performance discussions with the employee is definitely not often enough. Once a month is better – and makes the task easier.
  2. If you have having discussions often, then nothing should come as a surprise at the performance appraisal.
  3. Try to avoid too much discussion about past performance. It is important to recognise success and it is important to discuss any areas where development is needed.  But the main thrust of the discussion should be about future needs and how you can jointly meet them.
  4. Review processes often involve too much paperwork. Keep it simple.
  5. Be aware of any management bias. You may not personally like the individual, but that should not influence the discussion.  This is about their performance and the results achieved, not about how they achieved them.  So if they do things differently from you, don’t automatically think they are wrong.

 

If you think this article is useful and you would like more advice on dealing with this – or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

How Can I Help? (to improve Mental Health in the Workplace)

Mental Health in the WorkPlace has hit the news again this week, with The Duke of Cambridge talking on this subject to employers and employees from a range of British businesses.

I wrote a blog post on this subject back in May, but it bears repeating as there are things we can all be doing to help people cope.  Employers, in particular, can make small changes which will have a huge impact.  And why wouldn’t you, when it can also have a huge and beneficial impact on productivity and costs in your Organisation?

What can an employer do to improve mental health in the workplace?

Any organisation can – and should -create a Mental Health plan and then follow it and communicate it to all employees.  Here are some suggestions to help you to improve the mental health of your employees  and to combat mental health issues at work:

  • Create an open atmosphere where people feel they can talk about such issues. You can do this by making employees aware of what help is available and where they can access it. Facilitate open discussions amongst employees.
  • Ensure you offer enough breaks from work and make sure people take them. When we get engrossed in a piece of work, it is easy to skip lunch, or work late. But this can be counter-productive and lead to other problems.  Make sure people take regular breaks from work and have a change of scene.  Try and encourage a good work-life balance – and LEAD BY EXAMPLE.  If people see you working all hours and not taking breaks, they will follow your lead as they will think that is what you expect of them as well.
  • Try and give people interesting, varied work which they can excel at. This will increase their sense of worth and happiness at work.
  • Praising people when they do well, exciting them about challenges and opportunities, recognising them when they do well. All of these will help to prevent mental health problems from occurring in the first place. 

Supporting those with Mental Health issues

  • Think about appointing some Mental Health “First Aiders” or mentors.  They can act as a first port of call when somebody is in urgent need of support. As well as urgent issues, they can provide support and mentoring to those who have issues but feel they cannot approach you or their manager.  You would need to train these people, but it would be an investment well worth making.
  • If you manage people, or have line managers who support teams, then train the managers to recognise mental health problems and in how to manage such conversations.
  • The Mental Health Foundation provides a series of guides about dealing with mental health problems. You  can download these at no cost. Or you could order some paper copies to keep in the workplace for anyone who needs them.
  • If someone does disclose that they have a mental health problem, it could be made worse by other things.  Things such as money worries, fear of losing job, fear of taking time off, fear of talking about it. Investigate gently with the individual  – there might be something you can do to help with those concerns.
  • Offer access to a counselling service or at least a helpline.
  • If possible, provide a telephone in a private area, where an employee can ring a helpline or contact a charity for some help in an urgent situation.
  • Many Mental Health charities can provide support to you and your employees. Investigate the options which work for you and your company and provide details to your employees.  Provide a list of those charities to any employee who discloses they have a mental health issue.  There is a huge amount of help available for those who need it.

 

If you think this article is useful and you would like more advice on dealing with this  -or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

 

The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing But The Truth

The Art of Giving a Reference

When we change jobs, we are all keen to be given a good reference to give to our new employer.

On the other hand, many employers these days only give a basic reference which confirms that the person worked for them for a specific period and what the job title was.  This is only of limited use to a new employer as it gives no indication of how well or badly the employee performed in the role or how they got on with colleagues and/or customers.

As a result, there is a general belief that “references are not worth the paper they are written on”.  This is a real shame when a little care could really help the recruitment process along.

Why do we only give out basic information?

Employers are frightened of horror stories of legislation.  “We might get sued if we say something nasty” and so they feel obliged to say as little as possible and to keep it very bland.  Additionally, many do not trust their managers to give references as they might inadvertently say something which may cause a problem for the Company.

Yet references should be a really powerful tool in the recruitment process. They should tell an employer whether the person is qualified to do the job and what experience they have; they should tell about any performance issues, or triumphs; they should tell of any misconduct or grievance; they should give an idea of the attendance record and any patterns of absence;  they should tell about the relationships and whether the person is a good fit for the new role and the team they will be working with.

How  can you write a “safe” reference, which also helps the new employer?

  1. References must be truthful and factual.  The manager or colleagues may have an opinion – good or bad – about the individual, but this should not be included, unless it is based on fact which can be backed up with evidence. So an opinion that “he was always late, never arrived in work at the right time” would need to be backed up with a record of occasions of lateness, plus evidence of a conversation (or even formal action) with the individual pointing out their lateness and exploring the reasons for it and giving targets for improvement.   Equally, if your opinion is that “she is the best sales person we have ever employed” then you should really be able to back that up with evidence of meeting high sales targets, or great customer feedback.  You don’t have to share any evidence with the new employer, but it must exist so you could produce it if anybody questioned the truth of your reference
  2. Contrary to popular belief, references can include “bad” things – but again, they must be backed up by evidence. So if the person  has a day off sick every other Monday, then it is fine to say so, as long as the attendance records exist which back this up.  It would also be helpful if you could show that you have taken this up with the individual and made them aware it is not acceptable and have agreed a way forward to improve things.
  3. There should be no surprises. You cannot say that the person was not very good at dealing with customers, unless you have had a conversation (or even a formal meeting) with the individual and told them about this problem and a record has been kept, with a copy given to the employee.  If dealing with customers is a critical part of their job, you would again need to show an agreed improvement plan.
  4. The employee may well get to see the reference. It is not unusual for a potential or new employer to show the reference they have received to the individual or even to ask their opinion of what has been said.  Indeed, I suggest this is a good idea for an employer to do.
  5. If you follow all these rules the individual will not be able to show it is not fair.  You might find it helpful to share a copy of the reference with them so they can see what has been said.  They may ask you to change it, but you don’t have to do that.  At least they will have seen you have been honest and they can take the opportunity to consider how to address any negatives with the new employer.
  6. These rules apply to verbal references as well as written ones. Employers sometimes feel they can get round the “difficult” issues by making  a quick ‘phone call to the previous employer, rather than getting a written reference.  This is risky as the person on the receiving end of the reference may well write notes or write the conversation down and it becomes as much of a liability as a written reference would have been.  In any event, is is unfair on the individual to say something which they are not able to be party to or to answer.
  7. Some employers get round the problem by allowing managers to give “personal character references” but not official work sanctioned references. This is also risky as the receiving manager is likely to think it is an “official” reference and to treat it as such, so the risks are still there.  It is better for the employer to produce the reference centrally, with input from the individual’s line manager – or to spend a small amount of time in training managers to write proper references (or show them this video!).

In a nutshell

Please produce and send meaningful references, following the above guidelines.  It will be helpful for the employee, helpful for the new employer – and you may be grateful for the same courtesy when you are next recruiting. It could help save an expensive mistake.

If you think this article is useful and you would like more advice on dealing with this  -or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.