Love and Leadership

Do the words “love” and “leadership” belong in the same sentence? And what does that word “love” actually mean, anyway?

The dictionary definition is fairly simple.  Love is “an intense feeling of deep affection”.   Or it can be “a great interest and pleasure in something”.

We have all felt love, haven’t we? Love for a parent or a sibling; love for a partner or a child; even love for a pet.  Of course, these types of love are all different from each other. The love of a mother for her child is different from the love of someone for their life partner.  And that is different from the love between two brothers.  OR IS IT?

I couldn’t say that I love my husband differently from the way I love my sister, or my cats.  Yes, the intensity of the feeling might vary, and the physical expression of that feeling might differ, but the way I treat my loved one is no different.  For me, it means you want the best for that person, you want them to be happy, you want them to succeed.  If you love someone, you will go the extra mile for them. You will put yourself out for them. Or you would change your plans to accommodate them.  Their welfare is important to you and you care about what they are thinking and feeling.   These things are common for every type of love.

What do we mean by “love” in the workplace?

Firstly let’s separate the feeling of love from the actions which we take when we feel love.  Then it is easy to see how this can translate to the workplace. Indeed, it can apply to any other situation in our daily lives.

We go to work for a variety of different reasons. The basic reason is usually to earn money to fund everything else in our lives.  But while we are there, we have dealings with other people.  Most of us want those dealings to be pleasant, friendly and helpful.  Our colleagues can even grow into being personal friends.

For those dealings with others to be pleasant and effective, then we really need to love those people.  We want the best for them, we want them to succeed, we put ourselves out for them, we help them. We do this, probably unconsciously, all the time. Maybe we thank people and we help people. Perhaps we teach people what we know.  We help them to do the best job they can do.  The underlying reason we do these things may be that we want them to do the same for us.  We all have a need for love, and the workplace is no different from anywhere else – we want to be “liked”.

So what about love and leadership?

A leader – whether in the workplace or politics, or in a sports team or a country –  would do well to show these outward expressions of love to the people they lead.  Surely a leader should want the best for the team? They should want team members to be happy and to succeed? If those things are true for individual members of a team, then they will be true for the whole team.

In a position of leadership, I would say it is absolutely critical to “love” those you lead.  On that will rest your success as a leader and the success of the outcome you are seeking.

How does a leader show love? Put every single possible step in place to ensure the welfare (physical and mental) of your team. Make sure your team are at the heart of all your plans and decisions. Be prepared to change course (or at least adjust the course) if it will be a better option for people. Consult with your team regularly to temperature test your plans. Make sure everybody is included.

The benefits of love and leadership

The strange thing about love is that the more you give out, the more you get back.  A leader who loves the people they lead will find that those people are prepared to love them in return.  They will bend over backwards to meet deadlines.  Perhaps, they will sing the praises of the leader. Because they feel safe and secure they will do their best work. They will make sacrifices if necessary. In short, they will love the leader.

The question may not be “what are the benefits if I lead my team with love?”  It is better to ask  “what will be the size and consequence of the failure, if I don’t love my team?”

Oh, and what is the biggest benefit of all?  You will find you love yourself, as well.

But what about the difficult decisions?

You may think you would not gain respect if you are “soft” on your team.  My answer to that is that love is not soft.  It comes from a place of strength.  People will respect you far more for being kind, helpful, approachable and, yes – loving.

There are times in business when difficult decisions have to be made. Sometimes we have to do some difficult things. I am thinking about times like redundancies, disciplinaries, even dismissals.  You might think that love doesn’t have a place in these types of action.

But I would say just the opposite.  There have been any  number of really difficult and unpleasant situations I have had to manage.  I have seen every reaction you could imagine. And I am proud that I have helped people when they are facing some of the darkest times of their working lives.  I have treated them as humans.  Yes – I have loved them.

 If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

Things You Should Know About Appointing A Manager

Appointing a manager is probably the most important business decision you will ever make.  If you get it right, you will find that your recruitment bill goes down and your staff retention figures go up.   Your customers will love you and return for more business. You will prevent a huge number of sleepless nights and headaches due to people problems in your business.

How can you be sure you have chosen the right people to be managers in your business?

A good example, or a terrible warning?

How do you want your employees, customers, suppliers, ex-employees to remember your business?  Do you want them to feel confident that your company provides the best service, with the least possible difficulty?  Do you want them to know that your team is knowledgeable, friendly, helpful?  Would you like people to say your company is a great business to deal with?  Or if employees said it was the happiest place to work?

Or would you rather that people warned others not to work in your company?  They might say you don’t care about your employees.  Or customers might complain about bad service from a grumpy employee?  How would you feel if your reputation was for a great product, but that people wouldn’t use your company again?

What have these things got to do with appointing  a manager?

Your managers are critical to the reputation of your business.  Even if they never have any customer dealings.  Of if they manage a support function, rather than the front line.   A poor manager will never be able to get the best from the team.  And the resulting problems will have a knock-on effect on other parts of the business.

Your managers can make or break your business. The investment in your managers is the most important investment you will ever make.  And you need to ensure you get a good return on that investment.

So how should you choose a successful manager?

The very worst reason to appoint a manager

I have seen it hundreds of times.  And it is often a disaster.

Someone is really good at the job they do.  They might be achieving far better results than anyone else.  In so many companies, that alone is the reason why they are then promoted to manage a team of people doing that job.  If they are good at the job, then surely that makes them the ideal person to lead others doing that job?  Wrong!  As well as being a good widget maker, they might also have the skills to train other widget makers.  Or they might be empathic, good listeners.  They might be good at decision-making, team leading, communicating, inspiring others.  But just because they are a good widget maker does not guarantee that they are good at those other things too.

I once knew a sales manager who was absolutely brilliant at sales.  He was able to be charming to customers and to achieve seemingly impossible sales figures.  But he was a bully and his team were all terrified of him.  Soon, some very good  sales people left the company.  And the people who needed some development and encouragement never got it.   The team performance started to drop alarmingly.  The team effectiveness spiralled downwards and the sales figures for the team became very low.   Eventually, the CEO took action and the manager was moved.  He was replaced by a manager who had people skills and who could get the best from the team. Magically, the figures started to improve and the team overall became more effective.  Their figures were consistently good – and not reliant on just one good performer.

Tips for appointing a successful manager

The most important skills needed by a successful manager are people skills.  These include things like the ability to communicate and to understand what motivates others.  They need to be able to deal with stressful situations for themselves and their team.  They need to manage conflict and change.  They need to be able to inspire and encourage.

But you don’t need someone who is a soft touch and gives in to every demand made on them.  They must be decisive and able to navigate difficult decision making processes.  Then they need to be able to communicate their decision and the reason.

Additionally, your investment should include initial and ongoing management training.  You cannot throw someone into a management role and expect them to just pick it up by themselves.  Many of the necessary skills can be learnt and developed with practice.

And what about the time to manage people?  Managing a team  can take up an enormous amount of time and energy.  Doing it successfully requires planning and giving time to the team members.  So a team manager cannot also hold down a fulltime job doing other things.  The team manager needs to view managing the team as the major part of their job.  Any other work they can also do is a bonus!  This is another reason not to give your best widget maker the promotion to being the widget team manager.

Planning Ahead

As with every other aspect of your business, my most important piece of advice when appointing a manager is for you to plan ahead.  Design your management structure before you need to create or replace managers.  That way, you can give serious thought to the qualities of the person you are seeking to appoint.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

How High Productivity Will Prevent Resignations

What is high productivity and how can we achieve it?

I have been writing articles about improving productivity for the last two or three months.  There are often press items about how the UK is suffering from low productivity.  Employers are continually being encouraged to do things to improve productivity.

But what does high productivity mean?

What does “high productivity” actually mean?

Essentially, to be highly productive, we need to make the best use of our time and resources.

This does not necessarily mean doing things more quickly.  If we rush things and make mistakes, we might need to do them again.  So that is not very productive.

Productivity is not about perfection.  We might want to be the best at what we do.  We might want to manufacture the very best products in our field.  Or maybe we want to beat the competition and make our items better than others that are on offer.  But being the best may not be productive.  It can take a long time to produce something which is better than the competition. Others might be churning out something which is not quite as good, but at a faster rate, or lower cost.  So who is then the more productive?

Sometimes “good enough” is good enough

If our products are of a standard which is acceptable and which sells well, then we may not need to produce the very best.  Of course, we may want to have a reputation as “the best”.  In that case, we need to strive to create perfection.  But the majority of businesses can do very well by producing a quality that is good enough, but not perfect.

If we do want to produce premium goods and be known for being “the best”, then our measure of productivity will be different to that of our competitors.

High productivity is not an absolute and is not strictly measurable.  It is also something which changes on a daily basis.  It depends on a variety of things, only some of which are under our control.

Factors which affect high productivity

Things which affect high productivity are many and varied.  If we employ people, then those employees have a large impact on the rate of productivity.  If they work quickly and accurately, then the business is more likely to be highly productive. When they are not able to work as speedily as we would like, then they may be less productive.

The availability, cost and quality of raw materials to produce our end goods has a huge impact on the productivity of our business.  This may – or may not – be within our control. But how we manage the supply chain is critical. We may need to regularly review our suppliers.

The weather, state of the transport system, global economy, clearly all have an impact.  These things affect us all and so our competitors also have to manage these peaks and troughs.  But they are often outside our sphere of management.

Managing people to create high productivity

The one factor which is in our control is the way we manage the people who work for us.  On a daily basis, there may be external factors in their lives which affect their individual productivity.  We may have a limited ability to change that.

But how we manage people in general, and individuals in particular, is a critical factor in the level of our business productivity.

As human beings, we all want to be valued.  We all want to be loved and appreciated.  This is true in the workplace as much – or more – than in our private lives.  We have a need to be accepted and to believe that we are useful.  We shine more brightly when we know our purpose and feel appreciated.

The one, major, thing which every employer can do to improve productivity within the workplace is to value, thank and cherish our employees.  Do they know their purpose and how their particular role fits into the overall business vision?  Do they understand that you appreciate their efforts and value their input?Can they be sure they have the right skills to do the job well?  Do they believe they are being paid fairly for their work?  If the answer to all of those questions is “yes”, then you are well on your way to high productivity in your workplace.

A salutary tale

I had coffee with a friend this week.  She has recently left her workplace after 9 years in her job.  When she told her boss she was leaving, he said he was really disappointed.  He said she was highly skilled and that he really appreciated her work.

Too little, too late.

Her feeling was this.  Had he told her how she was valued earlier in their working relationship, she would probably never have got to the point of moving on.  Had she felt appreciated and fairly paid, then she would never have looked for another job.

I have known employers who offer a pay rise to prevent someone from leaving the company.  Sometimes that offer is accepted.  But it is never a good solution. People will not feel the warmth from a pay increase for long.  They will remember that they had to resign to get the appreciation.  So they will keep looking for a better employer.

If you want to improve productivity, then look after your employees – and do it now.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support to work out a plan for higher productivity, then  contact us for a no-obligation discussion about how we can help.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

How A Social Media Policy Avoids These Productivity Pitfalls

Social media can be good for your business.  You can use it as a marketing tool.  Or you can advertise your vacant roles.  Maybe you use it to keep an eye on your competitors.  Or it can just provide some light relief from a heavy workload.

We all use social media these days – and that includes your employees.  And that is where it can all go wrong, of course.  So do you have any control over how your employees use social media?  And should you care?

Monitoring the use of social media

Some employers may want to try the “blanket ban” approach to social media in the workplace, but this is often counter-productive and almost impossible to enforce.  Many people have access to computers at work and nearly all will carry a personal mobile phone.  Some companies even provide a mobile phone for work purposes.  Social media is available on all of these devices.

If you were to try this approach, you would find it very unpopular with your employees. A better option might be to allow “reasonable” use at work.  If your employees have a sensible workload and are engaged and interested in their work, they will not abuse this trust.  They might choose to have a quick look at Instagram whilst they grab a coffee.  But they are not likely to spend hours scrolling through Facebook posts.  If your staff are being managed properly, then you should find there is little problem with over-use at work.

Productivity Pitfalls

There is potential for more of a problem if people are posting comments, rather than just reading posts. This could become a more serious cost to productivity. If people are getting involved in long “conversations” in social media, then they are not thinking about their work.  They might only take a few minutes to post something but their train of thought is broken.  It takes a while for that concentration to return.  This can easily happen repeatedly if they are answering a string of comments on a social media post.

There may be a further problem if the content is inappropriate.   This covers a variety of risks.  It might be something which potentially damages your business reputation.  Or it could be something for which the employer is blamed (vicarious liability). It could breach confidentiality.  It could alienate your clients.

This, of course, leads to potential disciplinary action.  That is inevitably another drain on productivity for the employee who posted the comment and others.  It will affect all the people involved as witnesses or doing an investigation.  Or those involved in the hearing.   The productivity of the whole team will also take a knock.  They may need to take on extra work whilst the disciplinary action is ongoing.  Additionally, they may well be talking amongst themselves about it.  And, depending on the severity of any sanction, they may have to adjust to a different person in the team, or a realignment of the work.

Other concerns

Other things which employers may want to guard against include:

  • There is evidently a risk of introducing malware into your systems.
  • Reputational cost. This depends on the content of the employee’s comments.
  • Negative comments about colleagues – or even threats. I have been involved in the dismissal of an employee where they had made a physical threat to a colleague on social media.
  • Loss of trust between employee and employer. This could even lead to a situation where the relationship is untenable.

This is not a complete list of the things which can be a problem in social media posts, from an employment perspective.  You may be concerned about other issues as well.   If that is the case, then I would urge you to take professional HR or legal advice.

How can employers avoid this productivity drain?

My approach would be to allow reasonable use of social media at work – or at least not to try and stop it.

I would urge any employer to safeguard themselves by producing a Social Media policy.  If there are clear rules and they have been properly communicated, this can go a long way to achieving acceptable use.  In particular, it is important to lay down what is NOT acceptable.

If people are allowed the freedom to make sensible choices, they will generally behave as adults.  We all like to know our boundaries and work within them.  If the guidelines are not restrictive, we do not generally breach them.

You may have exceptions to this in your workforce.  With a clear policy in place, you have the means to deal fairly with any issues.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on producing a Social Media policy  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

 

How To Change Your Corporate Culture So Your Profits Increase

Do you think you need to change your corporate culture?  If nothing is wrong, you may not think you need to change.  But just because nothing seems wrong, it doesn’t mean a change is not necessary.

Some time ago I worked with a company of about 300 employees who were spread across a number of different sites.

The Company had grown from a family owned and run small business and had built up a reputation for quality and innovation.  Sadly, to a certain extent, they were still relying on their good name and the culture had slipped in to one where people were just jogging along.  There was no innovation and productivity was getting lower.   Nothing was particularly wrong, but there was a general air of boredom and a lack of enthusiasm.

Additionally, there were petty squabbles among staff and people were quick to raise a grievance.  The rate of sickness absence increased for minor ailments.

Taking Action

The Board of Directors decided to combine the work done at the various sites.  Consequently they would move everybody to one site.  This was intended to decrease the overheads.  Additionally, productivity might be increased by bringing everyone under one roof.  Such was the thinking.

I was brought in to facilitate the site moves. I soon realised that these moves, in themselves, would not solve the productivity problem.  In fact, initially, things were likely to get worse.  Rebuilding teams from people who had worked in separate physical sites was a challenge.  Particularly as each site had its own, slightly different, culture.

Deciding to change your corporate culture

If you think you might need to change your corporate culture, then where do you start?

For us, the first step was for the Board to recognise that a change was needed. They could see that the different site managers had each had a different approach.  This had led to a stricter, slightly stifled regime at one site, whilst a couple of others had become lax and mistakes were creeping in.   The first need was to establish what the desired culture should look like.  Then we had to build a roadmap of how to achieve that, with milestones along the way.

Collaborating with employees

If you want to change your corporate culture, it is really important to talk to the employees.

We wanted to know what worked and what did not (and why).   The organisation was unionised and we worked with the Trade Unions.  But additionally, at each site, we set up a working group of volunteers to plan the site moves.  We sent out a survey, to be completed anonymously.  This was to gauge what worked and what did not.  We also used the Trade Unions to speak to their members and line managers to speak to their teams.

One critical factor was to communicate the plans and proposals.  We also provided some training on managing change.  Where individuals had specific concerns and issues, we held individual consultation meetings.  Along with practical issues about the move, we also communicated our desire to build a new, collaborative, culture.  We asked employees to work with us to outline our future direction.  Their suggestions contributed largely to our plans.

Accepting casualties

We found that not every employee shared our vision of collaboration and engagement.  Some decided that they did not want to move sites; some decided that they did not like the new “feel” to the Company.  We provided training and support, where applicable, to help people to adjust, but we also accepted that some would never settle and agreed to an amicable parting.

There were also a number of people who were content to continue jogging along at their steady pace.  They were doing a good job, but not an excellent one.  They were not disengaged from the Company, but were not actively engaged either.  We approached this by giving every opportunity for them to voice their opinions, give their ideas, get involved.

For many, we accepted that “a good job” was good enough and that these were the backbone of the company. We trained our line managers in spotting signs of disengagement.  We gave them the tools to engage with their teams.

For the minority of high-achievers, who were full of innovation and enthusiasm, we had given a chance to shine.   We subsequently found that the number of these high-achievers increased.

Walking the walk

The first step in this change had been to engage with the top team.  This continued to be an important step and is an ongoing need.  The team at the very top of a company needs to be the example they want to set.  The adage “be the change you want to see” is critical in business.

Whether or not it is a conscious decision, employees will always take their lead from managers. If your employees see you working long hours, they will do so too.  They will assume that is what you want from them.

If you fail to take a break, or if you send emails late at night, then that is also what your employees will do.  If you go into work even when you are obviously sick, then your employees will drag themselves in as well – and pass their germs to all and sundry.

Getting it right leads to other benefits

When we are shopping, we want to buy from responsible producers and suppliers. We want to feel comfortable with their ethos and approach.  In the same way,  employees want to work for companies which have a culture which they can fit into.  If you have a good reputation as an employer, then you will find that recruitment is easier for you.  You will be able to retain good employees.  You will have a lower rate of sickness absence.  It is likely that you will have fewer performance issues.  This will also have a positive effect on your marketing and will appeal to customers.

So you might want to change your corporate culture, even if you don’t think it is bad.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – contact us for a no-obligation chat.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit. Why not join the JMA HR mailing list?  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

A Highly Engaged Workforce – The Secret To Increased Profits?

A highly engaged workforce is, of course,  a “nice-to-have” in business. But in these days of anxiety about Brexit and recruitment difficulties, you might feel that you have more important things to worry about.

You need to concentrate on the bottom line, making the money come in, paying your employees and keeping your customers happy.  Sure, it would be great to have a highly engaged workforce.  This has been an important topic in the business world  for years.   But some research carried out by Dale Carnegie shows that many organisations are not happy with the progress they have made in this arena. As many as 85% of leaders say that employee engagement is a priority.  But only a third of organisations actually take meaningful action.

Signs of success

The evidence is there that companies who have  highly engaged workforces are outperforming their competitors by a large margin in terms of earnings per share.

It costs approximately £30,000 to replace the average employee.  Surely, it is better to keep your employees happy so you don’t need to replace them so often.

But how and where do you start to raise levels of employee engagement?

“It ain’t what you do…”

I have talked in previous articles about the key factors of employee engagement.  It is easy to say that an organisation needs to increase trust and integrity.  It is easy to understand that employees need the chance to have their opinion heard, or to be thanked for an achievement.

But how can these principles be embedded within an organisation?

“….It’s the way that you do it”

How can you ensure that you have highly engaged workforce? The most important step for you to take  is to make it a strategic business priority.  Make sure that everyone knows the importance of employee engagement and the benefits of it.   This includes you, your managers – and everyone working in the organisation.  Start at the top and make sure that all of your managers are highly engaged.  Dale Carnegie’s research showed that only a third of senior leaders felt engaged with their organisation.   If your managers are not engaged, how can they inspire the people who work with them?

Once you make employee engagement  a strategic priority, you can put steps in place to enable your managers to achieve this goal.  Managers need some specific skills to help them build an environment of engagement.  See my article about management skills for more information.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on making employee engagement into a strategic priority – please  contact us for further guidance.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit.  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

 

How Workplace Gratitude Can Inspire Productivity

Workplace gratitude is not a phrase which comes readily to mind.

Most of us are taught as children to be grateful for gifts and to thank people for kindness.  This carries over to adult life and many have a daily habit of gratitude.  Some keep journals of things for which to be grateful. Speaking from personal experience, this can have a profound effect on life and mental wellbeing.

But this does not often spill over into the workplace.  In many organisations it may not feel appropriate or comfortable to show gratitude.  Employers may be missing out, though, if they don’t encourage a culture of workplace gratitude.

Why should employers encourage workplace gratitude?

Gratitude in daily life can raise energy and positivity.  It makes us feel good – and makes the recipient feel good too.  In the same way, gratitude at work can raise productivity; help employee engagement and lead to a positive organisational culture.

In turn, these changes lead to better teamwork, higher productivity, staff retention.  Employers can see an increase in employee resilience.  This can lead to less sickness absence, more innovation, better performance.

Workplace gratitude is definitely a worthwhile investment.

Why don’t we encourage workplace gratitude?

It is, perhaps, understandable that many managers find it difficult to give negative feedback to employees.  But why is it so hard for us to say “thank you” at work?

Some managers cannot see why someone should be thanked just because they do their job.  But what I am suggesting is that we thank people for specific things they do, rather than just general thanks for doing the job.

There may also be concerns that someone will expect more than just a thank you.  If we thank them for doing something well, will they expect a pay rise or a bonus?   That is another reason to build a culture where gratitude is an everyday occurrence.

Another fear is that gratitude is somehow “soft” or “cheesy”.  The emphasis is on being genuine and authentic.  Don’t say “thank you” unless you really feel gratitude.  But when you think about the effort involved – or the time saved, or other benefit – then it is easy to feel gratitude.

How to build a culture of gratitude in the workplace

It starts at the very top.  If the business owner and leaders take the time to notice the small things which ease the day and contribute to success, then it encourages everyone else to do the same thing. You might feel uncomfortable thanking someone for making sure the printer was stocked with paper but if you thank people regularly, it will become second nature.

The more specific you can be with your thanks, the better.  If you thank people in general terms for their work or their contribution, then it ceases to mean much.  They will think it is just so much “management speak”.  They may not see the real gratitude behind your words.

In the same vein of keeping it authentic, it is better to thank people at the appropriate time, rather than waiting to thank them in a team meeting every month.  And remember, some people don’t like to be thanked in public and may prefer an email or a quiet personal word of thanks.

Your thanks will be more authentic if you can show awareness of the small things, as well as major achievements,.  Of course it is good to celebrate big successes – a major sale or bringing a new product to market.  But it is critical to also thank the employee who took on extra work to cover for a sick colleague, or the person who worked so hard to turn around a complaint from a customer.

Encourage your employees to show gratitude

Encourage your employees to give back to charity initiatives, or to show social responsibility by contributing their skills or time to help others. You can lead the way with an organisational social responsibility agenda, or preferred charities which your company supports.

If you are trying to build a shift in your culture, then consulting with your employees is a good way to start.  Talk to them about gratitude and how it can be shown – and received.  They will have their own ideas and they will be able to tell you what works for them, and what doesn’t work.

Train your managers and employees to thank each other when things go right and to avoid blame when things are not so good.  Look on mistakes as learning opportunities.

But don’t force it.  If it is not authentic, then it will feel unnatural and people will be very uncomfortable. We all crave genuine gratitude when we have achieved something or had a success.  But that can very soon go sour if there is a lack of authenticity.

Random Acts of Kindness in the workplace

There is a movement afoot in the world to encourage people to carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward. This encompasses things like paying for a coffee for a stranger, or letting a vehicle merge into traffic from a side street.

As with other forms of gratitude, carrying out a random act of kindness  leads to more  empathy and compassion.  It  can help us to  connect with others and it brings a higher level of energy.

One way to increase workplace gratitude is to encourage random acts of kindness within the workplace.  Some suggestions:

  • Be on time – or let people know if you cannot avoid being late
  • Start and end meetings on time
  • Ask questions and really listen to the answers
  • Say thank you and mean it
  • Make time to chat with someone who needs it
  • Pay for someone behind you in the cafeteria, or buy for a colleague
  • Give someone a compliment
  • Give up a good parking spot
  • Smile
  • Leave change in the vending machine
  • Hold the door open for someone
  • Listen to someone else’s point of view without jumping in or judging them
  • Solve someone’s problem
  • Do something for someone without being asked
  • Make a recommendation about someone
  • Give good feedback on someone to their boss
  • Do a charity drive (for example, collect postage stamps for your favourite charity)
  • Clean up the mess in the kitchen (even if you didn’t make it)
  • Ask someone how they are and really be interested in their answer – show you will listen if they are not OK
  • Let go of a grudge
  • Admit your mistakes
  • Be friendly
  • Respect others

 

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

 Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit.  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

Strategies To Create A Positive Organisational Culture

As business owners, we all like to think that we have a  positive organisational culture.  Ideally, we want the  people who work for us to be happy and see the organisation as positive and supportive.

If our employees work well together and collaborate with each other, we will see increased profitability and growth.

In previous articles, I have talked about sharing your vision so that everyone is working towards the same goal and can understand their own part in that journey.  Where people are trusted and appreciated, they have the impetus and the freedom to be innovative and creative.

Avoiding blame

Where communications are clear and leadership is strong and collaborative, then the climate is right for people to develop and grow.

So how can a blame culture creep into our organisation?   However much we work on sharing our vision and values and communicating our goals, organisational culture is defined by the people who work for us and their interactions with each other.

It is critical, therefore, that we learn to recognise the signs of a less than positive organisational culture and that we act to change the direction before there is a downward spiral.

Benefits of a positive organisational culture

Harvard Business School professors John Kotter and James Heskett did some research in the 1990s over a 10 year period.  Their findings showed that positive organisational cultures were linked to financial growth (a four fold increase).

A positive culture aids recruitment and retention of employees .  It can have an impact on customer service and it gives public credibility to your business.

Reviewing the situation

You may think your company culture is positive, but it is always helpful to review the situation.  Even if your employees are happy and motivated, you may find underlying trends which are less than positive.  If there is no conflict at all in your business, that could be a warning sign.  This can indicate complacency or a lack of confidence in suggesting a change to the status quo.  If you have a lack of diversity in your workplace,  you might find this will lead to stagnation.

On the other end of the scale, what happens when people cannot work well together?  This can lead to bad decision-making, loss of confidence, financial loss – even public embarrassment (remember the recent Ted Baker scandal?).

Warning signs

Many business problems are down to people issues.  You may be concerned about financial slowdown,  governance and legislative difficulties or other business-related difficulties.  But when you drill down into these, they are often rooted in difficulties with employees.

If you struggle to get new products to market, the fault may not be the organisational processes.  There might be a human aversion to risk which is at the bottom of the problem.  If you are finding it difficult to comply with governance or legislative imperatives, have a second look at your employees.  There is likely to be a problem with decision-making, ownership or understanding.

You may be proud of the fact that you collaborate with your employees, and allow them to collaborate with each other.  But have you given any thought to your consultation processes?  The real problem might be that people are spending hours of their time in large, unwieldy and unproductive meetings.

Alternatively, you may be very clear that you do not have a culture of blame in your organisation.  But have you listened to what people are saying to each other?  There might be implied criticism, even where it is not explicit. This can have a really detrimental impact on the confidence and abilities of the person on the receiving end – especially where there is a difference in position within the company.

Putting it Right

It is a fact that most of the problems in business are “people problems”.   We all have our own ways of doing things, our own unpredictability.  We are complex and we are all different.  This can make it difficult to resolve problems, but where you are able to create a positive organisational culture, you will reap the rewards.

The key to successfully changing your organisational culture is based on the same principles I have been writing about recently.  If you can engage with your employees, you will be well on the way to a positive culture.

As a reminder, those principles are:

Have a strong vision which you share with your employees and they can understand their part in helping to achieve the vision;

Give your employees a voice, so they can be confident in giving opinions and making suggestions in a blame-free culture, where they know they will be heard.

Show appreciation  of your employees and recognise their skills and achievements, so they are encouraged to give their utmost.

Build an environment of trust and integrity as a two-way street so that your employees feel confident in your leadership.

Achieving a positive organisational culture

The dictionary definition of culture is as follows: the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society.  In business – your business – culture is based on your values and behaviours.  When those align with your business strategy, then your employees will be engaged and your customers will be happy to buy.

A positive organisational culture allows each person to take responsibility for their own work, their own achievements and successes, their own mistakes.  It allows others to recognise that we all do things differently and the only “right way” to do something is the way that works for the individual and the organisation.  Where people make mistakes (as we all do), there is no blame.

So it is in your hands to create a positive culture within your business and to ensure that it stays that way.   If you can achieve that, then you will find it easier to deal with those business problems and difficulties and you will achieve productivity and growth.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit.  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

Collaboration, Collaboration, Collaboration – Implementing A Positive Employment Culture

In recent articles we have looked at how to implement a positive employment culture in business.  This will help to increase employee loyalty, business growth and profitability.

But who is responsible for introducing employee engagement into an organisation?  And how can trust and engagement be maintained?

Can a strategic HR partner – such as JMA HR – implement employee engagement for you?  The answer to this is that –  whilst we can support, advice and facilitate –  we cannot make it happen.  The change in the organisation’s culture has to come from within –  from the top –  and everyone in the company has a part to play.

Living the dream

It is a bit of a cliché that you need to model the change you want to happen.  You would probably like to have a workforce which is actively engaged in improving your business.  You want them to work towards achieving your business vision and to be an advocate for your organisation.  Your attitudes, behaviours and approach  will all filter down throughout the organisation.  If you are invariably polite, helpful, and friendly to people, then you are a positive role model for your employees.  If you lock yourself in your office and discourage others from interrupting you, then you cannot blame your staff if they do not make an effort to engage with your customers.

In previous articles we have looked at positive ways of interacting with your employees.  If you show trust in people, recognise their efforts, listen to their ideas and concerns and share your vision with them, you are a model for the behaviours and attitudes you want them to demonstrate.

Implementing a positive employment culture

The individuals who have people management responsibilities (including you if you manage others) are key to the successful introduction of a positive employment culture.  Like the senior team, they are role models for the workforce.  But their role is more critical.  They will hear employee views, concerns, ideas – and ensure implementation, or answers.  They are the people in the ideal position to recognise – and highlight – small successes.  You need to provide training and development for line managers, so that they know and understand their role in achieving a high level of engagement.

Other stakeholders

There may be others within your business who have an impact on the levels of employee engagement.

If you recognise Trade Unions and have Union representatives within the organisation, then you need to partner with them. Again, they may need some training or development.  At the very least, you need to consult and collaborate with them on the best ways to achieve success.   Even if you do not recognise Trade Unions, you may have employees who are members of a Union.  Those employees will want advice and support from their Union and if you are aware of such a link, then you may want to inform the relevant Union of your intentions and the (positive) impact you are intending.  In my experience, relationships with Trade Unions work much better where the Union is considered as a partner with the business.  Everyone is (or should be) aiming for the same goal – fulfilled, engaged and happy employees.

The most important player

The lynch pin to all of this effort is, of course, the employee him/herself.  You can implement as many positive practices as possible but if the employee does not engage with you, then you cannot force that to happen.

In my experience (and reinforced by recent research), there are relatively few actively disengaged employees.  These are the ones who are seeking other employment and who are taking every opportunity to give negative views of your business.

It is far more likely that your workforce is largely made up of people who come to work every day, do an “OK” job and are not really terribly interested.  They may take another job elsewhere if the opportunity arises, but they are not actively seeking a change and may stay with you, jogging along, for years.   Think how much your business could grow and thrive if you could catch and maintain the interest of even some of these people.

Where do we start?

The key to a positive employment culture is to actually start engaging with your employees.  It sounds obvious and simple but it is, surprisingly often, the missing ingredient.   You can start by telling your employees what you are trying to achieve and why – and emphasise the benefits for them.  If you collaborate with them on ways and means to achieve their engagement, then it will start to happen.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on dealing with this  – or any other people-related issue in your business – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit.  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.

7 Steps To Build Trust In The Workplace

What does trust in the workplace look like?

It might be better to ask what trust feels like.  Trust is really an emotional response in the workplace, as it is anywhere.  Employees need to know that their managers are on their side and that they will be treated like adults, not children.   This means that you should avoid micro-managing.  If you oversee people with a light touch and trust their judgement, then they will prove trustworthy.

If your employees trust you, they will have confidence in your decisions.  They believe that you will do what you say you will do and so they feel “safe” with you. If your words and actions do not match, then that trust will be lost.

Once trust has been lost, it can be very difficult to recover.  It is much better to build trust from the very beginning of your interaction with every employee. You need to earn the trust of people by delivering on what you say and keeping promises.

Behaviours to build trust in the workplace

  1. Gratitude: Find something to thank people for and give them praise when it is due. We all like to receive unsolicited, unplanned praise and thanks.   It feels good if our actions are noticed and appreciated.   But it has to be genuine.  Give credit when you see good work and you will start to build an appreciative culture in your company.
  2. Compassion: Show your employees that you care about them and what they are doing and feeling. This can be demonstrated by listening to what they say and taking action where appropriate.  Want the best for your employees. Value them as people more than you value them as “resources”.  Be kind and say “yes” whenever possible.  If you have to say “no”, then explain why.  Be approachable and friendly.  We trust people we like.
  3. Communication: Give others a chance to talk, to ask questions, get answers and voice concerns. Get to know them – and smile! Share information as much as possible – especially when it is necessary to the individual. Think about your body language and non-verbal communication and whether that is supporting what you are saying.

What other behaviours build trust?

  1. Avoiding Blame. Show support for your team members, even when they have made a mistake.  Respond constructively to problems and help to find solutions. Keep your perspective and don’t over-react.  Take responsibility for failures – even when they are avoidable.  They are your responsibility because you are the boss and you must protect your employees.   You might find it helpful to give your employees the benefit of the doubt. On the other side of the coin – admit when the company makes mistakes, or when you personally make a mistake. Treat mistakes as learning opportunities for you and your employees.
  2. Competence: Be good at what you do and be passionate about your work.  This doesn’t mean you have to know everything – it is OK for your team to know more than you.  If you do not know something, then admit it and say you will find out the answer.  Then make sure you feedback your findings. Model the behaviour you want to see and make sure your managers do the same. Competence is important and you also need to invest in your employees’ development to improve their competence
  3. Credibility: Be transparent with your team and don’t try to hide things. Try to explain your thought processes. Be honest with them and ask for their feedback. It is critical to keep your word and follow up on promises.  When you (and your managers) acknowledge your mistakes as well as successes, employees see you as credible and will follow your lead. Be comfortable owning mistakes. Consistency is also important, so don’t keep changing the goalposts. Consistently doing what you say you’ll do builds trust over time – it can’t be something you do only occasionally.
  4. Respect : Respect everyone and treat your employees like adults. Try to avoid bias and beware that sometimes bias is unconscious. You should try to remember that everyone else is just as important as you are. Always be respectful of other peoples’ ideas and perspectives and give people the benefit of the doubt.

Things you can do to build trust in the workplace

You need to be aware of how your managers and supervisors behave.  It will help to build trust in the workplace if all of your supervisors are capable of forming positive relationships with people who report to them. The relationship between employees and managers is key to having trust in the workplace.  When that relationship goes sour, then it permeates throughout the team.  Choosing your managers and supervisors is key .

So-called “soft” skills are critical in the workplace.  This includes skills to build relationships with people. This is not just for supervisory posts, but for everyone.  These skills can be learnt and so it is wise to invest in developing people in these skills.

It is important to provide as much information to employees as possible.  If there is a hint of some changes or anything which affects the workplace, then people will gossip and speculate. It is counter-productive for rumours to run through the organisation and so be as honest as possible and make sure you keep communicating. It is difficult to over-communicate.

Managing people issues helps to build trust

Your actions can build trust in the workplace just as much as your words do.  It is important to deal with difficult employment issues firmly, quickly and fairly.  People will be watching what you do.  If you allow someone to “get away with” poor attendance or behaviour, then the trust of other employees will start to evaporate.

At the same time it is really important to protect the interests and the confidentiality of all employees, even those who are causing some difficulty. You must not talk about absent employees and you must not allow others to talk about them.  Opinions about employees and their actions should only be shared with the individual him or herself.

I have already said that if you trust people they will prove trustworthy.   If you believe that all of your employees are capable and willing to do their work to the best of their ability, then they will put in their best efforts to prove that you are correct.  When you treat them like approachable adults, they are less likely to behave like sulky children.

If you think this article is useful and you would like any strategic HR support or information  on building trust in your workplace – please join our mailing list, or contact us for further guidance.

Jill Aburrow runs an HR strategic consultancy business – JMA HR .  She provides strategic HR advice and support to businesses who want to improve loyalty, growth and profit.  Jill has been a professional strategic HR advisor for over two decades. She is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (FCIPD) and has a Post Graduate Certificate in Employment Law.